A Sabbath Message 4/30/22 -Did Acts 20:7 Change the Sabbath?

Did Acts 20:7 Change the Sabbath?

There are some that may think that Acts 20:7 changed the day of rest and worship from Saturday, the seventh day of the week, to Sunday, the first day of the week. As a defender of God’s Holy Commandments. I ask, can one verse of scripture change God’s fourth commandment without a “thus saith the Lord, …” in the Old Testament or a “Verily, Verily, I say unto you, …” by Jesus himself in the New Testament? After all, the ten commandments were spoken from the mount and written by the very finger of God [H430 – Elohiym (the “us” in Genesis 1) – Logos (the Word that became flesh) with Theos (God – Father in Heaven) in John 1:1] in tablets of stone and placed in the Ark of the Covenant. The Word that became flesh spoke them! (Genesis 1:1, John 1:1, Exodus 20:1-21, 31:18) [Ex. 31:12-18 – Lord (verse 12) – יהוה – ye hôvâh – yeh-ho-vaw’ – From H1961; (the) self Existent or eternal; Jehovah, Jewish national name of God. KJV Usage: Jehovah, the Lord. > H1961 – היה – hâyâh haw-yaw’ – A primitive root (compare H1933); to exist, that is, be or becomecome to pass (always emphatic, and not a mere copula or auxiliary) KJV Usage: beacon, X altogether, be (-come, accomplished, committed, like), break, cause, come (to pass), continue, do, faint, fall, + follow, happen, X have, last, pertain, quit (one-) self, require, X use. Note: Term used in “I AM THAT I AM” in Exodus 3:14.]  He also commanded us to prove/show our love. (John 14:15) Let’s use some CSI – DOD (Comprehensive Scriptural Investigation – Doctrine of Definitions) here and see what we find. Acts 20:7-12 from the KJV with Strong’s numbers:

KJV(i) 7 And (G1161 – Moreover) upon (G1722 – about) the first day (Italics in KJV added by translators) of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached (G1256) unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and (G5037) – but) continued his speech (G3056) until midnight. 8 And (G1161 – Now) there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together. 9 And (G1161 – Also) there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as (“and” added in translation. G1161 used only three times in verse 9. “as” (G5613) is used twice in Acts 20 in verses 3 & 9.) Paul was long (G1909 – about) preaching (G1256), he sunk down with sleep, and (no index number) fell down from the third loft, and (G2532 – then) was taken up (G142) dead. 10 And (G1161 – Moreover) Paul went down, and (no index number) fell (falling) on him, and (G2532 – then) embracing him said, Trouble not yourselves; for his life is in him. 11 When (G1161 – But) he therefore (G3767) was come up again, and (G2532 – then) had broken bread, and (G2532 – and) eaten, and (G5037 – both) talked (G3656 – talking) a long while, even till break of day, so he (Paul) departed. 12 And (1161 – Also) they brought (G71) the young man alive (G2198), and (G2532 – but) were not a little comforted. (A negative import of being much more than just a “little comforted!)

*G5613 ὡς – which how, i.e. in that manner (very variously used, as follows) Derivation: probably adverb of comparative from G3739; KJV Usage: about, after (that), (according) as (it had been, it were), as soon (as), even as (like), for, how (greatly), like (as, unto), since, so (that), that, to wit, unto, when(-soever), while, X with all speed.

*G1161 – δέ – but, and, etc. Derivation: a primary particle (adversative or continuative); KJV Usage: also, and, but, moreover, now (often unexpressed in English).

*G2532 – καί – and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small words. Derivation: apparently, a primary particle, having a copulative and sometimes also a cumulative force; KJV Usage: and, also, both, but, even, for, if, or, so, that, then, therefore, when, yet.

*G5037 – τέ – both or also (properly, as correlation of G2532)
Derivation: a primary particle (enclitic) of connection or addition; KJV Usage: also, and, both, even, then, whether. [Often used in composition, usually as the latter participle.] 

*G1722 – ἐν – “in,” at, (up-)on, by, etc. Derivation: a primary preposition denoting (fixed) position (in place, time or state), and (by implication) instrumentality (medially or constructively), i.e. a relation of rest (intermediate between G1519 and G1537); KJV Usage: about, after, against, + almost, X altogether, among, X as, at, before, between, (here-)by (+ all means), for (… sake of), + give self wholly to, (here-)in(-to, -wardly), X mightily, (because) of, (up-)on, (open-)ly, X outwardly, one, X quickly, X shortly, (speedi-)ly, X that, X there(-in, -on), through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), under, when, where(-with), while, with(-in).

*G1909 – ἐπί – properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc. Derivation: a primary preposition; KJV Usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with.

*G1256 – διαλέγομαι – to say thoroughly, i.e. discuss (in argument or exhortation)
Derivation: middle voice from G1223 and G3004; KJV Usage: speach

*G3056 – λόγος – something said (including the thought); by implication, a topic (subject of discourse), also reasoning (the mental faculty) or motive; by extension, a computation; specially, (with the article in John) the Divine Expression (i.e. Christ). Derivation: from G3004; KJV Usage: account, cause, communication, X concerning, doctrine, fame, X have to do, intent, matter, mouth, preaching, question, reason, + reckon, remove, say(-ing), shew, X speaker, speech, talk, thing, none of these things move me, tidings, treatise, utterance, word, work.

*G142 – αἴρω – to lift up; by implication, to take up or away; figuratively, to raise (the voice), keep in suspense (the mind), specially, to sail away (i.e. weigh anchor); by Hebraism (compare H5375) to expiate sin. Derivation: a primary root; KJV Usage: away with, bear (up), carry, lift up, loose, make to doubt, put away, remove, take (away, up).

*G3767 – οὖν – (adverbially) certainly, or (conjunctionally) accordingly. Derivation: apparently a primary word; KJV Usage: and (so, truly), but, now (then), so (likewise then), then, therefore, verily, wherefore.

*G1909 – ἐπί – properly, meaning superimposition (of time, place, order, etc.), as a relation of distribution (with the genitive case), i.e. over, upon, etc.; of rest (with the dative case) at, on, etc.; of direction (with the accusative case) towards, upon, etc.
Derivation: a primary preposition; KJV Usage: about (the times), above, after, against, among, as long as (touching), at, beside, X have charge of, (be-, (where-))fore, in (a place, as much as, the time of, -to), (because) of, (up-)on (behalf of), over, (by, for) the space of, through(-out), (un-)to(-ward), with. [Translated “about” in Mt. 1:11, Mk. 14:51, Jn. 20:7, Acts 11:19]

*G3656 – ὁμιλέω – to be in company with, i.e. (by implication) to converse. Derivation: from G3658; KJV Usage: commune, talk.

*G71 – ἄγω – properly, to lead; by implication, to bring, drive, (reflexively) go, (specially) pass (time), or (figuratively) induce. Derivation: a primary verb; KJV Usage: be, bring (forth), carry, (let) go, keep, lead away, be open.

*G2198 – ζάω – to live (literally or figuratively) Derivation: a primary verb; KJV Usage: life(-time), (a-)live(-ly), quick.

This single verse in no way changes God’s Holy Commandment! The book of Acts was Luke’s second letter to Theophilus and Luke was rather specific on details both in his first letter and second. Let’s take a look at the details. The narrative that leads up to verse seven involves the journeys of Paul after the uproar in Ephesus. (Acts 19:21-41)

After an unspecified time in Macedonia (Acts 20:1-2) he went to Greece and spent three months. Changing his mind on going to Syria, he returned through Macedonia into Asia thus arriving at Troas after sailing away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread (following Passover). His companions preceded him and tarried in Troas. (verse 5) and Paul got there in five days and tarried for seven days. (Acts 20:4-6)

Paul had preached the on the sabbath (as was his custom) and the first (day) of the week was approaching and they sat to eat an evening meal (break bread). Keep in mind that days were reckoned from sunset to sunset. While eating, Paul continued his speech (dispute, preach (unto), reason (with), speak) until midnight for he was ready to depart on the morrow (first daylight of the week). He was just trying to get in some extra “exhortation” before departing at first light. It was an incident while Paul was “long preaching” that may have been a miracle. It was the third floor that Eutychus fell from! (verse 9) Paul went and embraced (συμπεριλαμβάνω – to take by enclosing altogether, i.e. earnestly throw the arms about one) him and alerted the people he was still alive. (verse 10) “When (G1161 – But, moreover, also) he was therefore (had) come (G305) up (G507) again (added in translation), and had broken bread, and eaten, and talked..”, Paul departed. (verse 11)

*G305 – ἀναβαίνω – to go up (literally or figuratively) Derivation: from G303 and the base of G939; KJV Usage: arise, ascend (up), climb (go, grow, rise, spring) up, come (up). {Luke uses this term in 24:34 and is translated “arise”, the only time translated so. It is exclusively used and translated ascend, ascended, ascendeth and ascending throughout the New Testament. Also, “climbed” in Lk:19:4, “climbeth” in John 10:1, and “come up” in Acts 8:31,39, 11:2, 20:11, Rev. 4:1 and 11:12.}  

> G303 – ἀνά – properly, up; but (by extension) used (distributively) severally, or (locally) at (etc.) Derivation: a primary preposition and adverb; KJV Usage: and, apiece, by, each, every (man), in, through.

> G939 – βάσις – a pace (“base”), i.e. (by implication) the foot
Derivation: from βαίνω (to walk); KJV Usage: foot.

This was an incident while Paul was getting in some extra “exhortation” while eating an evening meal. When Eutychus had fallen asleep then out the third floor window, Paul had rushed down to him, then alerted the others he was still alive – after embracing him. I believe this was a miracle as was with with Lazarus. (John 11:1-46) Did Paul intend this miracle as Jesus did Lazarus? Or, was it by faith? (Mt. 9:20-26, Mk. 5:20-36, Luke 7)

They carried him back upstairs, gave him something to eat and Paul “talked” until the break of day until he departed. The miracle was at least the fact that Eutychus had fallen out of a third story window and didn’t break his neck. Or did he? The fact that Paul was Long preaching and talking through the night part of the first of the week does not in no way change the sabbath day. I guess the moral of this incident was: Don’t fall asleep in a third story window while an apostle is preaching or talking, no matter how long winded he is! I do believe this an unintended miracle of Paul bringing Eutychus back to life after falling out a third story window.

Why did Luke mention this event in the mist of Paul’s travel record in Acts 20 in his second treatise to Theophilus? He was a dear friend of Paul. (Col. 4:14, 2Ti. 4:11) {These two verses are the only place in the New Testament “Luke” in mentioned. He is referred to as “Lucas” in Philemon 24, a “dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer’, and listed in the index as “2Cor s”, which is a possible reference to Luke/Lucas as the brother in Christ sent with Titus in 2Cor. 12:18, also the only two places “Lucas” is used. Luke was a Greek physician and his two treatises (Gospel of Luke and Acts) are an important part of the New Testament.} It was a miracle! BUT, it did not change God’s fourth commandment.

The fanciful idea (philosophy) that this one single verse justifies the changing of the seventh day sabbath is completely philosophical, something that Paul warned the Colossians about. (Col. 2:8) Paul often traveled on the first of the week, departing in the daylight. I’m pretty sure Paul, as well as the other apostles, were “long preaching” after sunset of the sabbath. Surely that doesn’t change the commandment of God. Better we use a dictionary!

Let’s try and rewrite Act 20:7-12 utilizing what we’ve learned with the various use of the conjunctions and definitions and improving upon the 1611 punctuation while using the same English terminology in paragraph form as follows:

“Moreover, upon the first of the week when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them ready to depart on the morrow, but continued his speech until midnight. Now, there were many lights in the upper chamber where they were gathered. Also, there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus being fallen into a deep sleep after Paul was long preaching. He sunk down with sleep, fell down from the third loft, then was taken up dead. Moreover, Paul went down falling on him, then embraced him saying, “Trouble not yourselves, for his life is in him.”, and he was therefore (was truly) come up again, then had broken bread and eaten. Both talked a long while, even to the break of day, so he (Paul) departed. Also, they brought the young man alive, but were not a little comforted.”

Another common verse used to justify Sunday is 1 Corinthians 16:2. All Paul is doing here is arranging a charity drive (work) on the first day of the week for the saints in Jerusalem. Read 1Cor.16:1-8 carefully! Paul won’t depart until after Pentecost. He is not changing the day of rest and worship to the first day of the week – Sunday and keeping Pentecost in Ephesus. Paul kept the annual holy days too.

God does not change!

Have a restful sabbath.

LOLGB+

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